Tell your governor that vape shops are essential services Take Action – Send a Message | Post a Tweet

https://grimmgreen.com/2020/03/28/tell-your-governor-that-vape-shops-are-essential-services-take-action-send-a-message-post-a-tweet/

States are responding to their own outbreaks of COVID-19 by implementing different versions of social distancing and shutting down non-essential services. While some of these businesses are being granted exemptions (for example, restaurants can still offer curbside pick-up and delivery and liquor stores are open with strict social distancing protocols), there are questions about whether or not vape shops are allowed to remain open in any capacity.

Thankfully CASAA has made it incredibly easy to to take action and make your voice heard

Governors need to hear from consumers about how important it is to maintain access to vapor shops–especially in a time of crisis. Under high stress and with limited options, it is very likely that we will see hundreds of thousands of people go back to smoking.

Click Here to visit CASAA and take action to keep vape shops open.  Let them know that it is #EssentialToUs

 

https://grimmgreen.com/2020/03/28/tell-your-governor-that-vape-shops-are-essential-services-take-action-send-a-message-post-a-tweet/

States are responding to their own outbreaks of COVID-19 by implementing different versions of social distancing and shutting down non-essential services. While some of these businesses are being granted exemptions (for example, restaurants can still offer curbside pick-up and delivery and liquor stores are open with strict social distancing protocols), there are questions about whether or not vape shops are allowed to remain open in any capacity.

Thankfully CASAA has made it incredibly easy to to take action and make your voice heard

Governors need to hear from consumers about how important it is to maintain access to vapor shops–especially in a time of crisis. Under high stress and with limited options, it is very likely that we will see hundreds of thousands of people go back to smoking.

Click Here to visit CASAA and take action to keep vape shops open.  Let them know that it is #EssentialToUs

 

Most Young People Do Not Vape, and Even Fewer Vape Regularly

https://vaping.org/most-young-people-do-not-vape-and-even-fewer-vape-regularly/

Fears of a Youth Vaping Epidemic May be Overblown, Finds NYU Analysis

While youth vaping rates have increased in recent years, most middle and high school students don’t vape or smoke and very few vape or smoke daily, finds a study led by researchers at NYU School of Global Public Health.

The study, published this month in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research, finds that over 80 percent of youth do not use any tobacco and over 86 percent don’t vape—and among the minority who do vape, most are not regular users. In addition, the study reveals that most youth who are vaping are also current or former smokers.

“Our findings underscore the importance of examining the full context of how youth are using vaping and tobacco products,” said Allison Glasser, an assistant research scientist at NYU School of Global Public Health and the study’s lead author. “The key to protecting youth in the United States is determining the patterns of frequency of use and co-use of vaping and tobacco products, which will give public health decision makers the best possible information to protect the public’s health.”

While the FDA and CDC’s National Youth Tobacco Survey has shown a concerning increase in youth vaping in recent years, little is known about the frequency with which youth use e-cigarettes—if it’s an occasional occurrence or a daily habit—as well as whether they also use more harmful smoked tobacco products like cigarettes and inexpensive cigars or cigarillos.

In this study, the researchers analyzed the 2018 National Youth Tobacco Survey in which more than 20,000 middle and high school students were asked about their use of various tobacco and vaping products in the past 30 days. The analysis was conducted on the 2018 survey, the latest available full data set; the 2019 National Youth Tobacco Survey, which showed that youth vaping continued to grow from 2018 to 2019, has not yet been made available for public analysis.

A critical finding across all surveys from 2013 to 2019 is that smoking actually decreased much more rapidly to a record low during the very same years vaping increased. From 2015 to 2018, daily cigarette smoking among youth declined from 1.2 percent to 0.9 percent, while regular vaping (20 or more out of the past 30 days) increased from 1.7 percent to 3.6 percent.

“The faster drop in smoking suggests vaping is helping displace youth use of much more deadly smoking—a net harm reduction benefit to the population as a whole,” said David Abrams, a professor of social and behavioral sciences at NYU School of Global Public Health and a study coauthor.

The researchers also found that while youth vaping increased from 2017 to 2018, the increase was driven by infrequent e-cigarette use rather than regular use: in 2018, while 13.8 percent of students had vaped in the past 30 days, more than half of them vaped five days or fewer.

Critically, the majority of youth vapers also use or have used more deadly tobacco products (60 to 88.9 percent, depending on the frequency of vaping). While there has been fear that e-cigarettes are introducing nicotine to many young people who otherwise would not have smoked, the data show otherwise—only a small proportion of tobacco-naïve youth report vaping.

“Examining tobacco and e-cigarette use patterns in youth is informative about the risk of continued use in adulthood. While in a perfect world young people would not be smoking or vaping, if the vast majority of youth who vape are already current or former smokers, vaping could offer them a safer alternative than cancer-causing cigarettes,” said Ray Niaura, a professor of social and behavioral sciences at NYU School of Global Public Health and a study coauthor.

“This study provides us with a better understanding of youth vaping patterns, which is critical for creating effective public health policies around nicotine and tobacco. Reacting too quickly to reports of youth vaping without considering the full context could do more harm than good,” added Abrams. “We need to avoid prohibitionist regulations like banning e-cigarettes—while leaving much more deadly cigarettes and cigars in corner stores—and instead should consider strong enforcement of age 21 sales restrictions. Prohibition creates a black market for vaping products or inadvertently pushes individuals back to smoking tobacco.”

In addition to Glasser, Niaura, and Abrams, study authors include Amanda Johnson of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and Jennifer Pearson of the University of Nevada, Reno School of Community Health Sciences.

About NYU School of Global Public Health
At the NYU School of Global Public Health (NYU GPH), we are preparing the next generation of public health pioneers with the critical thinking skills, acumen, and entrepreneurial approaches necessary to reinvent the public health paradigm. Devoted to employing a nontraditional, interdisciplinary model, NYU GPH aims to improve health worldwide through a unique blend of global public health studies, research, and practice. The School is located in the heart of New York City and extends to NYU’s global network on six continents. Innovation is at the core of our ambitious approach, thinking and teaching. For more, visit: http://publichealth.nyu.edu/

The post Most Young People Do Not Vape, and Even Fewer Vape Regularly appeared first on American Vaping Association.

https://vaping.org/most-young-people-do-not-vape-and-even-fewer-vape-regularly/

Fears of a Youth Vaping Epidemic May be Overblown, Finds NYU Analysis

While youth vaping rates have increased in recent years, most middle and high school students don’t vape or smoke and very few vape or smoke daily, finds a study led by researchers at NYU School of Global Public Health.

The study, published this month in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research, finds that over 80 percent of youth do not use any tobacco and over 86 percent don’t vape—and among the minority who do vape, most are not regular users. In addition, the study reveals that most youth who are vaping are also current or former smokers.

“Our findings underscore the importance of examining the full context of how youth are using vaping and tobacco products,” said Allison Glasser, an assistant research scientist at NYU School of Global Public Health and the study’s lead author. “The key to protecting youth in the United States is determining the patterns of frequency of use and co-use of vaping and tobacco products, which will give public health decision makers the best possible information to protect the public’s health.”

While the FDA and CDC’s National Youth Tobacco Survey has shown a concerning increase in youth vaping in recent years, little is known about the frequency with which youth use e-cigarettes—if it’s an occasional occurrence or a daily habit—as well as whether they also use more harmful smoked tobacco products like cigarettes and inexpensive cigars or cigarillos.

In this study, the researchers analyzed the 2018 National Youth Tobacco Survey in which more than 20,000 middle and high school students were asked about their use of various tobacco and vaping products in the past 30 days. The analysis was conducted on the 2018 survey, the latest available full data set; the 2019 National Youth Tobacco Survey, which showed that youth vaping continued to grow from 2018 to 2019, has not yet been made available for public analysis.

A critical finding across all surveys from 2013 to 2019 is that smoking actually decreased much more rapidly to a record low during the very same years vaping increased. From 2015 to 2018, daily cigarette smoking among youth declined from 1.2 percent to 0.9 percent, while regular vaping (20 or more out of the past 30 days) increased from 1.7 percent to 3.6 percent.

“The faster drop in smoking suggests vaping is helping displace youth use of much more deadly smoking—a net harm reduction benefit to the population as a whole,” said David Abrams, a professor of social and behavioral sciences at NYU School of Global Public Health and a study coauthor.

The researchers also found that while youth vaping increased from 2017 to 2018, the increase was driven by infrequent e-cigarette use rather than regular use: in 2018, while 13.8 percent of students had vaped in the past 30 days, more than half of them vaped five days or fewer.

Critically, the majority of youth vapers also use or have used more deadly tobacco products (60 to 88.9 percent, depending on the frequency of vaping). While there has been fear that e-cigarettes are introducing nicotine to many young people who otherwise would not have smoked, the data show otherwise—only a small proportion of tobacco-naïve youth report vaping.

“Examining tobacco and e-cigarette use patterns in youth is informative about the risk of continued use in adulthood. While in a perfect world young people would not be smoking or vaping, if the vast majority of youth who vape are already current or former smokers, vaping could offer them a safer alternative than cancer-causing cigarettes,” said Ray Niaura, a professor of social and behavioral sciences at NYU School of Global Public Health and a study coauthor.

“This study provides us with a better understanding of youth vaping patterns, which is critical for creating effective public health policies around nicotine and tobacco. Reacting too quickly to reports of youth vaping without considering the full context could do more harm than good,” added Abrams. “We need to avoid prohibitionist regulations like banning e-cigarettes—while leaving much more deadly cigarettes and cigars in corner stores—and instead should consider strong enforcement of age 21 sales restrictions. Prohibition creates a black market for vaping products or inadvertently pushes individuals back to smoking tobacco.”

In addition to Glasser, Niaura, and Abrams, study authors include Amanda Johnson of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and Jennifer Pearson of the University of Nevada, Reno School of Community Health Sciences.

About NYU School of Global Public Health
At the NYU School of Global Public Health (NYU GPH), we are preparing the next generation of public health pioneers with the critical thinking skills, acumen, and entrepreneurial approaches necessary to reinvent the public health paradigm. Devoted to employing a nontraditional, interdisciplinary model, NYU GPH aims to improve health worldwide through a unique blend of global public health studies, research, and practice. The School is located in the heart of New York City and extends to NYU’s global network on six continents. Innovation is at the core of our ambitious approach, thinking and teaching. For more, visit: http://publichealth.nyu.edu/

The post Most Young People Do Not Vape, and Even Fewer Vape Regularly appeared first on American Vaping Association.

Smok RPM 80 Pro or Voopoo Vinci X? Or is there a better competitor? (Also USB-C vapes)

https://www.reddit.com/r/Vaping/comments/fkei59/smok_rpm_80_pro_or_voopoo_vinci_x_or_is_there_a/

I’ve gone through a few Smok devices over the years, and every single one I’ve owned has 1) leaked like crazy and 2) burned coils really easily. A few months ago, after my Nord broke, I ended up getting a Uwell Caliburn which worked really well for me — minimal leaking and the coils lasted forever, unless I let the fluid get too low.

Unfortunately, the micro USB port broke a couple weeks ago. I’ve always hated micro USB, as I’ve seen that port fail on multiple devices, so now I’m looking for a pocketable nic salts vape with either a USB-C charging port or a removable battery.

The Smok RPM80 Pro and Voopoo Vinci X both looked interesting to me, as they both take 18650s, so I’d never have to worry about the micro USB port breaking. They also both have RBAs and 510 adapters available, and they can take any type of fluid, which is a plus. The Vinci X is slightly more expensive and has slightly less power than the RPM, but my experiences with with Smok products make me wary of them. I haven’t seen any other devices that compete with these two, or any devices with a USB-C port.

Both devices seem to have leaking issues from what I’ve read, but the Vinci X is supposed to have a mechanism to prevent it from happening. Some RPM owners say the leaking depends on the specific device you get, as Smok’s quality control isn’t the best, but my local vape store won’t take returns for leaking issues, so I’ll be stuck with whatever device I get.

So my questions are:

  1. Are there any devices that compete with the RPM80 Pro and Vinci X?
  2. Are there any vapes that use USB-C?
  3. Out of the RPM80 Pro and Vinci X, which is the better choice?

submitted by /u/shroomypoops
[link] [comments]

https://www.reddit.com/r/Vaping/comments/fkei59/smok_rpm_80_pro_or_voopoo_vinci_x_or_is_there_a/

I’ve gone through a few Smok devices over the years, and every single one I’ve owned has 1) leaked like crazy and 2) burned coils really easily. A few months ago, after my Nord broke, I ended up getting a Uwell Caliburn which worked really well for me — minimal leaking and the coils lasted forever, unless I let the fluid get too low.

Unfortunately, the micro USB port broke a couple weeks ago. I’ve always hated micro USB, as I’ve seen that port fail on multiple devices, so now I’m looking for a pocketable nic salts vape with either a USB-C charging port or a removable battery.

The Smok RPM80 Pro and Voopoo Vinci X both looked interesting to me, as they both take 18650s, so I’d never have to worry about the micro USB port breaking. They also both have RBAs and 510 adapters available, and they can take any type of fluid, which is a plus. The Vinci X is slightly more expensive and has slightly less power than the RPM, but my experiences with with Smok products make me wary of them. I haven’t seen any other devices that compete with these two, or any devices with a USB-C port.

Both devices seem to have leaking issues from what I’ve read, but the Vinci X is supposed to have a mechanism to prevent it from happening. Some RPM owners say the leaking depends on the specific device you get, as Smok’s quality control isn’t the best, but my local vape store won’t take returns for leaking issues, so I’ll be stuck with whatever device I get.

So my questions are:

  1. Are there any devices that compete with the RPM80 Pro and Vinci X?
  2. Are there any vapes that use USB-C?
  3. Out of the RPM80 Pro and Vinci X, which is the better choice?

submitted by /u/shroomypoops
[link] [comments]

Mayo Clinic junk science

https://grimmgreen.com/2020/02/12/mayo-clinic-junk-science/

The Mayo Clinic recently Tweeted about an experiment that 8th graders in Rochester NY did to show how dangerous vaping was.  The idea was they would compare developing zebrafish embryos developing in a solution of water and e-liquid, to those developing in just good normal fish water.

Obviously the e liquid fish died because… you know, generally anything other than normal good fish water is going to kill a fish.  Especially a DEVELOPING EMBRYO. I think this experiment could have been done with coffee or dish soap and come to the same results, but don’t take my word for it.

Screen Shot 2020-02-12 at 12.48.22 PM

As Charles A. Gardner pointed out, no other liquids were tried.  They are literally being taught junk science.  Obviously further experiments would have lead them to the conclusion that “oh, anything other than like… normal good fish water will harm them” This “experiment” was done with a conclusion in mind, that is some junk ass science.

-Grimm

Read the junk ass science if you want to 

https://grimmgreen.com/2020/02/12/mayo-clinic-junk-science/

The Mayo Clinic recently Tweeted about an experiment that 8th graders in Rochester NY did to show how dangerous vaping was.  The idea was they would compare developing zebrafish embryos developing in a solution of water and e-liquid, to those developing in just good normal fish water.

Obviously the e liquid fish died because… you know, generally anything other than normal good fish water is going to kill a fish.  Especially a DEVELOPING EMBRYO. I think this experiment could have been done with coffee or dish soap and come to the same results, but don’t take my word for it.

Screen Shot 2020-02-12 at 12.48.22 PM

As Charles A. Gardner pointed out, no other liquids were tried.  They are literally being taught junk science.  Obviously further experiments would have lead them to the conclusion that “oh, anything other than like… normal good fish water will harm them” This “experiment” was done with a conclusion in mind, that is some junk ass science.

-Grimm

Read the junk ass science if you want to 

E-Cigarettes Popular Among Recent Quitters: Study

https://grimmgreen.com/2020/02/05/e-cigarettes-popular-among-recent-quitters-study/

Well would you just look at that? Us World and News Report recently posted an article about a study that shows what we all have known for a decade. E-Cigs are popular among smokers for quitting. Is “duh” a strong enough word here?

The Greek cardiologist Dr. Konstantinos Farsalinos is behind this new study. The findings indicate that smokers find e-cigarettes a useful and effective quitting aid, and that some successful quitters eventually stop using e-cigarettes, according to the authors.

Someone get this study into the hands of our surgeon general Jerome Adams who still has his head in the sand regarding overwhelming evidence that yes! e-cigs are effective in getting smokers OFF of deadly combustible tobacco cigarettes

https://grimmgreen.com/2020/02/05/e-cigarettes-popular-among-recent-quitters-study/

Well would you just look at that? Us World and News Report recently posted an article about a study that shows what we all have known for a decade. E-Cigs are popular among smokers for quitting. Is “duh” a strong enough word here?

The Greek cardiologist Dr. Konstantinos Farsalinos is behind this new study. The findings indicate that smokers find e-cigarettes a useful and effective quitting aid, and that some successful quitters eventually stop using e-cigarettes, according to the authors.

Someone get this study into the hands of our surgeon general Jerome Adams who still has his head in the sand regarding overwhelming evidence that yes! e-cigs are effective in getting smokers OFF of deadly combustible tobacco cigarettes

Smok Issues (Who Would Have Guessed)

https://www.reddit.com/r/Vaping/comments/ey2hgx/smok_issues_who_would_have_guessed/

I’m having an issue with the pod itself. The device is perfectly fine. Basically I have two pods. One is completely burnt and done for and the other is basically brand new. When I put the pod in the light turns on and then fades to show that the pod has been detected but when I go to hit it I get a white blinking light. It blinks four times then stops. I tested the other pod to see if it was the device but it’s not. The other one works just fine other that being horribly burnt. The pod in question was working just fine a couple hours ago but has now stopped working. Please help… (Forgot to clarify. It’s the Smok Mico)

submitted by /u/oAddison
[link] [comments]

https://www.reddit.com/r/Vaping/comments/ey2hgx/smok_issues_who_would_have_guessed/

I’m having an issue with the pod itself. The device is perfectly fine. Basically I have two pods. One is completely burnt and done for and the other is basically brand new. When I put the pod in the light turns on and then fades to show that the pod has been detected but when I go to hit it I get a white blinking light. It blinks four times then stops. I tested the other pod to see if it was the device but it’s not. The other one works just fine other that being horribly burnt. The pod in question was working just fine a couple hours ago but has now stopped working. Please help… (Forgot to clarify. It’s the Smok Mico)

submitted by /u/oAddison
[link] [comments]